Broadband Communities

AUG-SEP 2017

BROADBAND COMMUNITIES is the leading source of information on digital and broadband technologies for buildings and communities. Our editorial aims to accelerate the deployment of Fiber-To-The-Home and Fiber-To-The-Premises.

Issue link: http://bbcmag.epubxp.com/i/872729

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 52 of 66

44 | BROADBAND COMMUNITIES | www.broadbandcommunities.com | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017 TECHNOLOGY Best Practices for Installing Fiber in Buildings Operators have several choices in installing fiber to an apartment or office unit. The right answer depends on building construction and other considerations. By Shaun Trezise / PPC Broadband T he advantages of fiber optic cable over copper wire for some applications are well understood. Fiber can transfer more data in less time over longer distances than copper. It does not degrade like copper, requires little maintenance and loses only a fraction of its signal strength over 325 feet. Consumer demand for faster internet speeds is fueled by video and music streaming services and over-the-top bundles. is has caused operators to rethink their strategies when it comes to fiber. For network operators that want to install fiber in apartment buildings and multistory offices, there are typically three phases to a fiber installation in a multiple dwelling unit (MDU) or commercial building. First, the fiber has to be taken from the curb into the building. en it needs to be routed from the basement to each floor in the building. In the final phase – which is similar to the last drop in installations of fiber to single-family premises – the cable has to be brought into individual apartments. Different techniques can be applied at any stage in the process. FIBER TO THE PREMISES e first phase of an in-building fiber installation typically involves bringing fiber cable from the curb to an outside distribution box. In most cases, the fiber is then brought inside the building. However, in some parts of the world – such as the Middle East – it is common practice for operators to install single fiber cables from the outside distribution box directly to individual apartments in point-to- point (P2P) cable runs through ducts and on the exterior walls of the building. e fiber is first connected to the distribution box. It is then inserted into an outdoor microduct, which is used to carry the fiber up the outside of the building into an individual apartment. For apartment blocks with four to six apartments, or small commercial buildings with a few offices, this kind of P2P cable run system can be cost-effective. However, scaling this method for medium- and high-density complexes is challenging and often not cost- effective. In these scenarios, the preferable method of installing fiber requires a staged approach throughout the building. One downside of this approach is that it can require considerable up-front expenditure. Depending upon the architecture, indoor optical The first phase of an in-building fiber installation typically involves bringing fiber cable from the curb to an outside distribution box. In most cases, the fiber is then brought inside the building.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Broadband Communities - AUG-SEP 2017